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Florian Ledoux © 2013 - 2019 - All rights reserved -  Forbidden Copy

"There are images that might impress you with their technical mastery, and then there are images that make you feel something. This photograph floored me. It is especially poignant given the climate crisis our world is facing right now."

Jarrad Seng, filmmaker, and Jury Skypixel/DJI.

About Florian

  • 1st Prize Aerial Photography (video) HIPA 2019 Dubai
  • Drone Photographer of the Year 2018 SIPA
  • Grand Prize Drone photography 2017
  • 1st Prize Wildlife The Nature Conservancy 2018
  • 1st Prize Drone Video Animals 2018
  • 1st Prize Landscape Arctic Biodiversity 2018
  • 3rd Prize Wildlife Arctic Biodiversity 2018
  • 3rd prize Drone Photography 2017
  • Highly Honored Nature's Best Photography 2018

Photography has always been my way of expression; it gives me a different perspective on the world, a new way to observe my surroundings and especially the means to capture moments of life to share with others. I started photography when I was 12 years old as a simple pleasure while traveling with my family. I was far to imagine that I will find in it my life power.

As a self-taught, I developed this passion until it became strong enough to become photo reporter in the French military Navy. In parallel, I started my own project by working on Greenland reportages. There is no doubt that the beauty of nature, the search for isolated and wild places in the Arctic, led me to photography.

Later my new project took me closer to the Arctic Wildlife, it was so intense that I had this desire to become a wildlife photographer to spend more time close to the different species.

Since, my work has been published in magazines like National Geographic, Time US, Géo France / Spain, Oceanographic UK, National Geographic Traveler, as well as in the international daily press.

My engagement to bring new and meaningful images is also recognized by conservation organism such as the International Union for the    Conservation of Nature.

Witness, Document, Protect the fragile Arctic

From West Greenland, I have sailed 6 000km over the course of eight weeks to Nunavut to explore and the document the Arctic Wildlife on Devon Island, Bylot Island, Baffin Island, Somerset Island, and the large Lancaster Sound, with a purpose to witness, document and protect.

In the same time I was there, On the 14th of August 2017, the Government of Canada and Nunavut agreed to establish the National Marine Conservation Area, the largest protected area in Canada called Tallurutiup Imanga. But the target of protecting 10 percent by 2020 still remains far. This was a great achievement but in 2016 only 4.7% of the Arctic’s marine areas were protected.

Polar Bears are facing a range of threats that are impacting their future population status. They are among the first refugees of climate change. The most striking observation during my reportage was the obvious lack of pack ice. According to the analysis carried out by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), with who I work, there is a real potential for a great reduction of the Polar Bear population if sea-ice loss continues over the long-term, which is forecasted by climate models and other studies. Reduced populations, poorer body condition, and changes in distribution and behavior are now apparent.

The pinnacle of my reportage expedition was undoubtedly my close encounters with these majestic yet gentle animals. For me, there is no better feeling than being close to those magnificent mammals, sharing a space with them. I will always remember that moment I saw my first polar bear, I cried during the three hours we stayed close to them. I discovered it swimming and by the time I left my binoculars to announce it to our captain, I was already crying.

When I find myself in the remote Arctic, co-existing in harmony with the wildlife that calls it home, I know that this is where everything makes total sense. I know it because I feel it deep within myself.  It is a deep vibe that consumes my body and soul in its entirety. At this moment, the urge to create an image that I would remember for the rest of my life with a strong message to protect it comes naturally to me.

Those moments are invaluable to me, something is happening within me.  It’s what I live for. When I photograph, I’m somewhere else. This is, I guess, what constitutes as passion, my passion to serve the conservation of the Arctic Wildlife.

I believe in and aspire to, bring a new perspective of capturing wildlife we already know well from traditional photography. I believe these images allow us to observe and document their behaviors from a new angle and approach, revealing the animals in their entirety as well as in a wider habitat and landscape, in a way not before possible, a new way of learning about the white northern part of our planet. It is more than time to act and I want my photo to help conservation to create more Marine Conservation Area.